Better Together: Days 1-3

For the last two years, I have taught College Composition, and these last two years have been an unending digital stack of student writing. To provide a clear picture of what those years have been like, when other teachers are sitting down for Thanksgiving pie, I’m in the back bedroom, recording hours of revision feedback. And it is appreciated, as one of my students below emailed me to say:

Screenshot 2017-07-16 at 11.01.35 AM

But it’s time for a change: time to empower my students to be the experts. Time to employ the tenets of one of my summer readings: Peer Feedback in the Classroom by Starr Sackstein. Sackstein believes that teaching students to support each other with revision suggestions provides them with agency. Since empowering students to think and learn for themselves remains my why, I really have to try giving up some control when it comes to writing feedback.

The first move Sackstein suggests is to build strong relationships within the classroom. If students don’t trust each other, and if they don’t trust me, then peer feedback will fail. “Respect can’t be assumed; it must be taught explicityly and modeled continuously” (Sackstein 20). Luckily for me, I had half of my next year’s students as 10th graders, but I will still need to set the stage. In the first three days, as we wait for students to get their very own Chromebooks in a new 1 to 1 initiative, I plan to work on some relationship and respect building.

Day 1: My very own Breakout EDU game, complete with students wearing first name tags, so I can start to get to know who they are and how they think.

Day 2: Open forum backchannel discussion: about such topics as flexible seating, silent reading, technology vs old school paper notes, the use of cell phones, and whatever else I can think of. The theme of the course is community, so we’ll use this discussion to build our ground rules. After a brief intro to the three essential questions of nonfiction from Beers and Probst’s Reading Nonfiction,

  1. What surprised me?
  2. What does the author think I already know?
  3. What challenged, changed, or confirmed what I already know?

We’ll watch one of my favorite TED Talks:

Students will take notes for their first writing assignment, connecting the three Qs of nonfiction to the video. For homework, students will write a reflection. I use this reflection as their first venture into college writing, as part of my measurement of their student growth. I should be able to use it to learn more about who they are as students, too.

Day 3: A short entry ticket: what is a single story and why is it dangerous? After a quiet 5 min quick write, we’ll have a brief, 5 min norming session of what it looks like to pair up to share ideas. What does it look like? Sound like? How will they know it is over? After a pair and a share with the class, we’ll dive into telling our own stories. How will we do this? With a fun round of two truths and a lie. This game should be a fun way to end the week. I will, of course, go first. Want my two truths? I shaved my head in college, and I once caught crickets that we fried up and ate. Yep, I’m a wild child at heart.

How about you, fellow readers? How will you build relationships with your students in the first three days?

“Learning Community Wordle” by Balboa Park Cultural Partnership is shared under a CC by-SA 2.0 license.

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