Generation Z Comes to KR

No, Generation Z does not mean Generation Zombie, although to the misinformed, watching students zone out with phones in hand might give that impression. But these students are not passively consuming media or mindlessly texting their friends. They are creators, innovators, entrepreneurs who see digital media as their way to share their thoughts with the world.

Recently, I attended a district provided professional development. The keynote speaker, Dr. Corey Seemiller, shared her research with what she sees as the latest generational shift. It seems that this generation, which she calls Generation Z, is just now entering colleges across the nation. According to Dr. Seemiller, this generation encompasses not only my own children, ages 8 and 11, but also the students that I am currently teaching in high school.

After hearing her talk, which confirmed many of my own beliefs about the young people with which I interact every day, I knew some general truths. Here are my revelations:

  1. Student agency is key. This generation craves the power to make their own choices, including how and when they learn.
  2. Be the guide, not the sage. Students still desire support from their instructors and enjoy meeting with them face to face. They want teachers to support their interests, not require them to be in lockstep with their peers.
  3. Connect learning to reality Learning should not be solely because “it prepares you for next year,” but have real world connections to adult life.

To implement these ideas, I am moving from a whole class approach, where everyone does everything at the same time and sits in an assigned desk chair, to flexible seating and flexible planning.

Flexible seating, lite

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How we like to ACT

I wish all of my seats allowed for student agency, but this corner is where I keep my flexible seating. Pillows, a carpet, some plastic chairs, and letting my students be the ones to choose: will they read or practice online for the ACT? In addition to 16 traditional desks, I have a standing desk (created by adding bed risers to a table), a round table, and a trapezoid table.

Digital Badges & Microcredentials

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LRNG is a nonprofit company that focuses on student engagement and learning. Learning is organized by playlists, which are made up of XPs, or experiences, that students must complete in order to earn badges. These badges, along with the evidence to which they are attached, are visible evidence of their learning.

In my classes, I have created several playlists in lieu of direct instruction. In this way, I hope to allow my students some flexibility in when and how they learn. In addition, I am adding some real world connections. For example, students are interviewing a professional in the field they wish to pursue, instead of interviewing a family member. LRNG has helped by connecting my students with mentors in the professional world.


As the year progresses, I hope to share more of my adventures in connecting with Generation Z.

“Gen Z” by  Abhijit Bhaduri is shared under CC by 2.0 license.

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Better Together: Days 1-3

For the last two years, I have taught College Composition, and these last two years have been an unending digital stack of student writing. To provide a clear picture of what those years have been like, when other teachers are sitting down for Thanksgiving pie, I’m in the back bedroom, recording hours of revision feedback. And it is appreciated, as one of my students below emailed me to say:

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But it’s time for a change: time to empower my students to be the experts. Time to employ the tenets of one of my summer readings: Peer Feedback in the Classroom by Starr Sackstein. Sackstein believes that teaching students to support each other with revision suggestions provides them with agency. Since empowering students to think and learn for themselves remains my why, I really have to try giving up some control when it comes to writing feedback.

The first move Sackstein suggests is to build strong relationships within the classroom. If students don’t trust each other, and if they don’t trust me, then peer feedback will fail. “Respect can’t be assumed; it must be taught explicityly and modeled continuously” (Sackstein 20). Luckily for me, I had half of my next year’s students as 10th graders, but I will still need to set the stage. In the first three days, as we wait for students to get their very own Chromebooks in a new 1 to 1 initiative, I plan to work on some relationship and respect building.

Day 1: My very own Breakout EDU game, complete with students wearing first name tags, so I can start to get to know who they are and how they think.

Day 2: Open forum backchannel discussion: about such topics as flexible seating, silent reading, technology vs old school paper notes, the use of cell phones, and whatever else I can think of. The theme of the course is community, so we’ll use this discussion to build our ground rules. After a brief intro to the three essential questions of nonfiction from Beers and Probst’s Reading Nonfiction,

  1. What surprised me?
  2. What does the author think I already know?
  3. What challenged, changed, or confirmed what I already know?

We’ll watch one of my favorite TED Talks:

Students will take notes for their first writing assignment, connecting the three Qs of nonfiction to the video. For homework, students will write a reflection. I use this reflection as their first venture into college writing, as part of my measurement of their student growth. I should be able to use it to learn more about who they are as students, too.

Day 3: A short entry ticket: what is a single story and why is it dangerous? After a quiet 5 min quick write, we’ll have a brief, 5 min norming session of what it looks like to pair up to share ideas. What does it look like? Sound like? How will they know it is over? After a pair and a share with the class, we’ll dive into telling our own stories. How will we do this? With a fun round of two truths and a lie. This game should be a fun way to end the week. I will, of course, go first. Want my two truths? I shaved my head in college, and I once caught crickets that we fried up and ate. Yep, I’m a wild child at heart.

How about you, fellow readers? How will you build relationships with your students in the first three days?

“Learning Community Wordle” by Balboa Park Cultural Partnership is shared under a CC by-SA 2.0 license.